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Closing Portugal’s shopping centres on Sundays - 20% of workers would be laid off

shoppingcentreThe president of the Portuguese Association of Commercial Centres, António Sampaio de Mattos, warned that the closure of shooping centres on Sundays would cost tens of thousands of jobs.

"The impact of such a closure would be that very close to 20% of the current jobs would end," said Sampaio de Mattos, in an interview with Jornal de Negócios on Monday.

"They say, to back up plans for Sunday closing, that in shopping centres, employees do not have weekends. Obviously, the people who work in the shopping centres have five days work, like all other Portuguese people," explained the association president.

"What they do not have is two days of rest on Saturday and Sunday. But this happens with doctors, with nurses, with transport, with the police, with a multitude of activities that have the same problem," says APCC president.

António Mattos also reminds that closing on Sunday would also have an impact on sales.

"It is clear that some of missed Sunday sales could be distributed on other days, but not all. Sunday is the third best day of the week for sales in shopping centres. The best day is Saturday, the second is Friday, and the third is Sunday," commented António Sampaio de Mattos

The discussion on the closure of shopping centres on Sundays began after the Bishop of Porto said this was a good idea.

Bishop Manuel da Silva Rodrigues Linda, criticised the, "new slavery of continuous labour."

"The richest countries in the world do not open supermarkets on Sunday," said the Bishop, seemingly unaware that Portugal is well down the worldwide rich list at number 54, in terms of GDP per capita.

Comments  

+1 #9 American Resident 2019-05-19 16:55
American atheist permanent resident here. Wish Portugal would follow the Bishop's advice and at least slow its inevitable descent into 24/7/365 consumerism. Close on Sundays or at least limit the hours? Hell yeah.
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+1 #8 Darcy 2019-05-16 20:51
The reason that Sunday is the first day of the week is because, Domingo in Latin is Domini, which means Gods Day, so under the Portugese culture the first day of the week should be given to God as the "creator of the universe."
This is particularly interesting because it not only shows Portugal is a monotheist country but also shows the Portugese tenacity and flare for commerce and trade.
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+1 #7 Dennis.P 2019-05-16 08:29
Our Portuguese language teacher, to explain the 'strange' numbering of the days of the week told us that Portugal never left their earlier Islamic system for many things and in many ways. So Sunday is the first 'working' day of the week. Monday is Segunda etc. Maybe we need an Iman to rule on this with a Portuguese Fatwa.
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0 #6 chez 2019-05-15 20:55
Silly B*****
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+5 #5 Lobo 2019-05-15 17:08
Let the church please worry about all child abuse among the believers instead of this issue where they are no part of. Or does this bishop hope we go back to the church on Sundays when they helped the shopping mall closed? I don’t believe so.
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0 #4 AL 2019-05-15 08:22
Quoting StefanD:
I think the Bishop needs to check the richest country in the world. The US, they open on Sundays. ... So do every other rich country I can think of.
The US is not even in the top ten richest countries in the world! Maybe the Bishop did his homework before making that comment.
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+12 #3 JamesAlgarve 2019-05-15 07:44
Separation of church and state.

Rule no.1
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0 #2 C Saunders 2019-05-15 07:29
All those restaurant owners and workers who work 6 days a week only get a chance to shop on Sundays. The UK manages quite well with limited hours' opening
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+6 #1 StefanD 2019-05-14 21:09
I think the Bishop needs to check the richest country in the world. The US, they open on Sundays. ... So do every other rich country I can think of.
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