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Companies want to mine lithium in protected areas

alentejoview2"The Directorate General of Energy and Geology should not put in public consultation requests for exploration rights in classified areas," argues environmental association Zero.

The organisation is concerned that more than 86,000 hectares of nature conservation land is part of the current 'great lithium rush.'

Hence, says Zero, "the attribution of exploration rights involving areas included in the Network of Protected Areas should be refused. "

Zero noted that in the last 16 months there have been 26 requests for exploration and research rights, 19 of which specifically refer to lithium and in total they cover an area of ​​over 616,000 hectares.

"Nine of the requests include about 27,000 hectares in protected areas, such as the Serra da Malcata Nature Reserve, with 56% of its area included in one of the applications," Zero said.

As there are overlaps between protected areas in the Natura 2000 network and those that are special protection areas or sites of Community importance, "it is noted that it concerns an overall area of ​​about 86,000 hectares designated by the Portuguese Government as protected areas.

"It is fundamental to make the process more transparent, with a real consultation with stakeholders and local populations, as well as through the use of the portal Participa.pt, whose clear and easy access structure helps participation in these processes," argues the association.

 

Comments  

0 #7 Blake 7 2019-05-20 22:25
Quoting Steven:
The EU has mining directives, not legislation and leaves it up to member states to do the right thing, therein lies the problem. Government and local councils are easily persuaded by investment $$ rather than prioritising environmental impact.

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Why don't you have a look at the environmental impact study carried out on the shale mining in England, that is truly disgusting.
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-1 #6 Steven 2019-05-20 16:16
The EU has mining directives, not legislation and leaves it up to member states to do the right thing, therein lies the problem. Government and local councils are easily persuaded by investment $$ rather than prioritising environmental impact.
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0 #5 Boris H 2019-05-19 18:31
Don't understand why some comment makers give red thumb for request of information.
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-3 #4 Darcy 2019-05-16 20:29
Quoting Steven:
Quoting Darcy:
Any mining company that intends to explore for resources in Portugal are subject to regulations and protocol by the municipal of that region and also along with this is EU regulations on mining. (see mining laws in in Portugal).


The regulations are flawed, and circumvented by local councils that aren't transparent in any shape or form. Look at the concessions granted to Australis in Pombal. Mining companies will return zero to the communities they destroy let alone the environmental damage they cause. They have no environmental rejuvenation responsibilities in Portugal as they do in large mining countries such as Australia. The population should not be complacent.

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Please explain how they are flawed ! ! !
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+2 #3 Steven 2019-05-16 10:27
Quoting Darcy:
Any mining company that intends to explore for resources in Portugal are subject to regulations and protocol by the municipal of that region and also along with this is EU regulations on mining. (see mining laws in in Portugal).


The regulations are flawed, and circumvented by local councils that aren't transparent in any shape or form. Look at the concessions granted to Australis in Pombal. Mining companies will return zero to the communities they destroy let alone the environmental damage they cause. They have no environmental rejuvenation responsibilities in Portugal as they do in large mining countries such as Australia. The population should not be complacent.
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-5 #2 Darcy 2019-05-15 09:03
Any mining company that intends to explore for resources in Portugal are subject to regulations and protocol by the municipal of that region and also along with this is EU regulations on mining. (see mining laws in in Portugal).
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+6 #1 Steve Davis 2019-05-15 05:48
Certainly Portugal needs a taxable - kept onshore - income from its mineral resources but equally sure Zero is spot on, and perhaps fruitlessly, asking for more transparency and real consultation. It is absurd that, in 2019, Portugal still does not have this. How likely that public hearings will be intentionally flawed with inadequate or inaccurate information as is still contemptuously routine? Note how some exploration licence applications do not even bother to specify what is being sought! Are these the ones for which contracts and bulky envelopes have already been exchanged?
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