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Four decades on from the Carnation Revolution, Portugal is adrift

  To mark the 40th anniversary of Portugal’s Carnation Revolution, the old chaimite tank decorated with peace signs has once again trundled along the Avenida da Liberdade. People walked the streets holding… Author      Antonio Peciccia      Researcher in International History at University of Salento  Disclosure Statement  Antonio Peciccia does not work for, consult to, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has no relevant affiliations.  The Conversation is funded by the following universities: Aberdeen, Birmingham, Bradford, Bristol, Cardiff, City, Durham, Glasgow Caledonian, Goldsmiths, Lancaster, Leeds, Liverpool, Nottingham, The Open University, Queen's University Belfast, Salford, Sheffield, Surrey, UCL and Warwick.  It also receives funding from: Hefce, Hefcw, SAGE, SFC, RCUK, The Nuffield Foundation, The Wellcome Trust, Esmée Fairbairn Foundation and The Alliance for Useful Evidence Events      Curator's Talk — University of Aberdeen — Aberdeen City      First EU Presidential Debate — University College London —      Institute of Irish Studies : Spring Semester Seminar Programme — Queen's University Belfast — Belfast, Belfast      Lorenzo Pellis: 'A recent research topic in viral transmission dynamics' — University of Warwick —  More Events This decorated Chaimite tank is a symbol of Portugal’s 1974 revolution.To mark the 40th anniversary of Portugal’s Carnation Revolution, the old chaimite tank decorated with peace signs has once again trundled along the Avenida da Liberdade. People walked the streets holding carnations and singing the verses of Grândola vila morena, the song by Zeca Afonso that has become the symbol of the Portuguese revolution.

The celebrations commemorate the day when mid-ranking officers of the Armed Forces Movement toppled the Estado Novo, the 50-year-old dictatorship of António Salazar and Marcelo Caetano and put an end to 13 years of colonial war in Africa. And for the third time, the protagonists of that revolution will not show up.

This is the third year in a row that the surviving members of the AFM are boycotting the commemorations in protest at the government and its policies. Once again, Major Otelo Saraiva de Carvalho, the old mastermind of the revolution, has publicly said that Portugal “needs a new AFM and a new 25th of April”.

They may be isolated, but his declarations still sound rather scary. The armed forces have already played a significant political role throughout recent Portuguese history.

READ the full article on The Conversation

The Conversation

 

 

Antonio Peciccia
Researcher in International History at University of Salento

Comments  

+2 #1 Greta Thompson 2014-04-28 12:22
There is clear overlap between general attitudes by Portuguese to their April 25th 1974 event (and all its connected antecedents and outcomes) with their 28 years of EU membership ... and the depressive mental state of a great number of them.

As though the EU had held out a great future; a genuine potential for the Portuguese to put Portugal back on the map as their history books tell them they were centuries ago - but that the bar has been set too high.

As this researched article tells us, unchanged for centuries is the Portuguese elites continued control on any progress that impacts on their interests.

One example being the elite keeping the systems and traditions of Portuguese justice and policing equally unchanged in their still having a 3rd way Latino 'chancer' option.

Which,as it only intends for 2 categories - law abiders and law breakers - tends to make EU Brussels law making ineffectual.
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